John Locke

John Locke was a 17th-century philosopher and physician, widely regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers and commonly known as the 'Father of Liberalism'. His work greatly affected the development of political philosophy and he contributed to the development of liberalism. Locke's theory of mind is often cited as the origin of modern conceptions of identity and the self, and he was the first to define the self through a continuity of consciousness. He postulated that the mind was a blank slate or tabula rasa. His political theory was founded on social contract theory, and he is also famous for his defense of the right to private property in his Second Treatise of Government.

Books

This list of books are ONLY the books that have been ranked on the lists that are aggregated on this site. This is not a comprehensive list of all books by this author.

  1. 1. Two Treatises of Government

    "Two Treatises of Government" is a seminal work in political philosophy, which outlines the author's theories on social contract and natural rights. The first treatise refutes the divine rights of kings, arguing that political power does not come from God but from the people. The second treatise introduces the idea of a government that exists to protect the rights of its citizens, particularly life, liberty, and property. The author posits that if a government fails to protect these rights, the people have the right to overthrow it. This work greatly influenced the development of democratic thought and the structure of modern democratic governments.

  2. 2. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

    This philosophical work explores the concept of human understanding, proposing that all knowledge is derived from experience. The author argues against innate ideas, suggesting instead that the mind is a blank slate at birth, filled over time through sensory and reflective experiences. The book covers a wide range of topics, including language, memory, identity, and the limits of human knowledge, and is considered a foundational text in empiricism.